Contact Us: 201-262-0010
50+ years of service and experience combined with innovative medicine and compassionate care

Specialty Services

Acupuncture

Cyrus is a 12 year old black Labradore Retriever who came in to the hospital with chronic neck pain. After 4 acupuncture treatments he was able to resume normal activity level including longer walks with his owner.

Cyrus is a 12 year old black Labradore Retriever who came in to the hospital with chronic neck pain. After 4 acupuncture treatments he was able to resume normal activity level including longer walks with his owner.

Veterinary acupuncture is an ancient technique of placing needles into special points, called acupoints, in order to affect the flow of qi (pronounced “chee”). Traditional Chinese Medicine describes qi as energy in the body. Qi flows along channels, or meridians, similarly to how a car moves along a winding highway. By western definition, the patient benefits from needle placement along these meridians through stimulation of certain local biochemical substances that can control pain and inflammation, improve circulation, and stimulate the immune system. Acupuncture is used in a variety of ways, but the most common way is to improve pain control in patients suffering from degenerative joint disease, such as arthritis. The technique can also be used to improve strength, comfort, and neurologic function with intervertebral disc disease, control of nausea or vomiting associated with cancer or illness, stimulation of appetite, increased level of energy or awareness, management of behavioral conditions, and control of other symptoms such as incontinence or weakness. Dr. Heather Troyer, our certified acupuncturist is now offering acupuncture services and Traditional Chinese Medical consultations at our hospital.

Her goal is to improve the quality of life in pets through integration of both conventional and holistic medical options.

If you would like a consultation or appointment, please call 201-262-0010.

 

Avian & Exotics

avian_reptile Our veterinarians are available by appointment for annual examinations, wellness care, and husbandry consultations guiding you to provide proper dental care, environment, and nutrition for your pet. Our facility includes a dedicated avian and exotics ward that is spacious and bright with temperature controlled cages that allow us to monitor your pet’s condition while minimizing stress.

avian_animalsSome of the typical pets we care for include:

  • Companion birds
  • Gerbils
  • Ferrets
  • Guinea Pigs
  • Chinchillas
  • Hamsters
  • Rabbits
  • Hedgehogs
  • Reptiles – lizards, snakes, turtles, tortoises
  • Frogs/Amphibians
  • Sugar Gliders
  • Rats/Mice

Our recommendation is to have your exotic pet examined yearly. Please bring your pet in an appropriate carrier to avoid unfortunate accidents and escapes.

What to expect at the annual visit:

  • Rabbits & Rodents – since dental problems are common an oral exam and possible trimming of the teeth is essential. Because external parasites are frequently found, the skin and ears will be carefully examined. Spaying and neutering is available and highly recommended for these pets.
  • Ferrets – vaccinations are routinely given to these pets. Spaying is essential for the female to prevent fatal anemia. Adrenal gland disease and pancreatic tumors called insulinomas are commonly encountered so your veterinarian may recommend testing for these problems.
  • Companion birds – at the yearly exam, beak trimming will be performed if indicated. Blood work is often performed at the annual visit since birds are susceptible to respiratory, liver, and kidney disease. Nutrition is extremely important in birds and appropriate recommendations will be given.
  • Reptiles – as with birds, nutrition is very important in reptiles. Providing a proper cage environment is necessary to prevent infectious diseases and parasites. Appropriate recommendations will be given by your veterinarian at the annual examination.

avian03

 

Behavioral Medicine

Behavioral medicine was added to the services offered at Oradell Animal Hospital in 2002. Our goal is to assist clients whose pets suffer from behavioral problems that non-medicinal training would not control. Consultations are designed to help you understand why your companions are suffering, and assist in reestablishing positive mental health.

Dogs and cats can suffer from a multitude of ailments ranging from severe phobias to aggressions. The first step in controlling these issues is understanding the “what and why” of each situation. Proper diagnosis dispels myths in behavior. It is common for a pet owner to assume that their pet is just being spiteful when in fact they may have a behavioral problem. We strive to help our clients learn the real reasons for their pets behavior and then find realistic options for a treatment plan.

Common behaviors include:

Dogs: aggressions, fears, phobias, housetraining difficulties, compulsiveness
Cats: house soiling, marking, aggression, fears, phobias

Consultations range between 1 ½ – 2 hours and include a review of your pets history, evaluation, diagnosis, and development of a treatment plan.

Types of treatment plans include:

  • Behavior modification
  • Medication
  • Environmental changes
  • Medical recommendations

Behavior cases should be seen by your referring veterinarian first in order to rule out any medical issues.

 

Bereavement Support

DickensDickens Susan Dowd StoneSusan Dowd Stone, MSW, LCSW PetLossHelp.org.

Oradell Animal Hospital, in keeping with its mission of compassionate care, is pleased to offer a pet bereavement class for those mourning the loss of their precious animal companion within the past three monthsThe group meets once a month on Tuesday evenings promptly at 7:00 PM. Out of respect for bereaved group member late arrivals will not be permitted to join the group past 7:10 PM.  Group focus includes the sharing of memories, receiving support throughout the grieving process and honoring the lives of our very special friends. Participants may attend up to three sessions, which can be attended over the course of a year and the classes are free of charge. To respect the privacy of attendees, there is no formal registration process.  Attendees must be at least 16 years of age or older.  The promotion of  products or services during this class is not allowed.

The group is facilitated by Susan Stone, LCSW a licensed clinical social worker with certifications in bereavement and who is also a former Delta Society Evaluator and Pet Partner Instructor. Ms. Stone initiated Animal Assisted Therapy Programs on several psychiatric units at Bergen County hospitals, and writes and speaks on the importance of the animal-human bond. Ms. Stone, a client of Oradell Animal Hospital formed the group after losing Dickens, her golden retriever and pet partner of many years.

In an effort to avoid overcrowding, classes are limited to clients whose pets are a patient of our hospital.  Please RSVP to ldavis@oradell.com or 201-262-0010 ext. 152.

Pet Bereavement Support Group

Honoring the lives of our beloved animal friends.

Upcoming Dates:

 

Facilitated by Susan Dowd Stone, a licensed, clinical social worker and an animal companion bereavement specialist and advocate Confidentiality, Validation, Understanding Group is free of charge Participants are encouraged to bring pictures of their pet. For more information please call (201) 262-0010 x152. Children must be 12 years or older to attend. Additional Resources: PetFriends Services is a hotline that provides free 24 hour grief support to NJ pet owners.  Call 856-234-4688 or 1-800- 404-PETS to speak with a trained, compassionate and non-judgmental support counselor.

www.petlosshelp.org

 

Cardiology

The Department of Cardiology at Oradell Animal Hospital was established in 2002 under the direction of Dr. Donald Schrope, Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Cardiology). The department focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of the cardiopulmonary system in dogs and cats.
Our cardiology specialists have over 20 years of combined experience and look forward to providing you and your pet the best possible care.  Our staff is capable of performing many types of diagnostic and therapeutic services.

Diagnostic Procedures:

click on the term to see definition

Therapeutic Procedures:

 

Dental & Oral Surgery

Pet’s Need Dental Care Too!!

Is your pet having any of these problems?

  • Bad breath
  • Chewing on one side of the mouth
  • Reddened gums
  • Dropping food when eating
  • Drooling
  • Pawing at face
  • Shying away when face or head is petted
  • Bleeding from mouth
  • Occasional unexplained behavioral changes
  • Loss of appetite
  • Refusing to chew on toys
  • Refusing to drink cold water
  • Refusing to eat hard food

80% of dogs and 70% of cats over age 3 have some form of oral disease. Your pet’s teeth should be brushed regularly to avoid gum disease. But even with regular brushing, it is necessary to have their teeth cleaned (scaled and polished) from time to time.

What are the changes seen with dental disease?

The process starts when soft plaque hardens into rough tartar. Tartar irritates and inflames the gums. This is a condition called gingivitis. Gingivitis, in turn, can lead to an infection called periodontal disease, which can cause bleeding gums, loss of teeth, and infection in the heart or kidneys if it is left untreated. Gingivitis and periodontitis also make it painful to eat, therefore, your pet could lose weight or even become anorexic. There are not always obvious physical signs of the disease, even when it is advanced. That is why it is so important to have your pet’s teeth checked regularly by your veterinarian.

Here’s what to expect during a dental procedure at Oradell Animal Hospital:

Because it is necessary to use general anesthesia while cleaning your pet’s teeth, the process begins with a physical examination. Your pet’s general health must be evaluated before anesthesia is administered to ensure that he/she is not put at risk.

  • A thorough exam is performed.
  • Pre-operative blood work, x-rays or ultrasound may need to be done.
  • A periodontal probe is used to check for pockets underneath the gum line where periodontal disease starts. Large pieces of tartar are removed with an ultrasonic scaler, and a hand scaler is used to remove tartar from crevices and underneath the gum line. Other tools are used to finish cleaning above and below the gum line.
  • Your pet’s teeth are polished to smooth out scratches in the enamel.
  • Your pet’s gums are washed with an antibacterial solution to help delay tartar buildup both above and below the gum line and to decrease chance of infection.
  • Your pet may receive a fluoride treatment to strengthen his teeth and to desensitize exposed roots.
  • Some teeth may require extraction if they are loose or badly infected.
  • The patient is monitored by a technician throughout the procedure and pain is managed appropriately.

On admission you will be told when to call for an update on the condition of your pet and to find out what time he/she can be released from the hospital. After the dental procedure it will be up to you to do daily home care to ensure your pet has a healthy and comfortable mouth. You will receive a complimentary dental package with brushing instructions.

Instructions for brushing your pet’s teeth

 

It is important to establish a pleasant routine for you and your pet. Start your home dental care program slowly and pick a time when you are both relaxed. Do not push to the point of agitation. Begin by simply handling your pet’s mouth for several minutes a day, go slowly, be affectionate and possibly use a treat as a reward.

Start by just handling the face, then the lips, and soon you will be able to rub the teeth and gums with your finger. Try a few drops of water flavored with garlic. Cats may prefer tuna juice. Using a soft pediatric toothbrush, brush the teeth. Use the flavored water, tuna juice or animal toothpaste. Concentrate primarily on the lip and cheek side of the teeth. Brush gently in a circular motion, holding the toothbrush at a 45 degree angle. Increase the number of teeth brushed each time until your pet accepts the routine willingly.

Stages of Periodontal Disease

Stage 1. Early Gingivitis Inflammation
Stage 2. Advanced Gingivitis Inflammation and gingival swelling
Stage 3. Early Periodontitis Inflammation, gingival swelling, and beginning of bone loss
Stage 4. Established Periodontitis Inflammation, gingival swelling, purulent discharge, bone loss, and tooth instability

 

Dermatology

Our board certified dermatologist, specializes in the diagnosis and management of skin issues affecting the entire body including ears, paws, and general coat. With many years of experience and a specialty in allergy testing and treatment including allergy vaccines that do not require injection your pet will be in good hands at Oradell.

We also perform skin biopsies, video otoscopy and we utilize the latest treatment options for allergies, as well as treating hair loss.

 

Diagnostic Imaging

Diagnostic Imaging Services available at Oradell Animal Hospital include ultrasound, and ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy procedures, MRI, radiology (x-ray imaging and radiographic contrast studies) and fluoroscopy (moving picture/real time x-ray imaging). Diagnostic imaging services are used by all services of the hospital for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with all types of disease conditions. The staff involved with diagnostic imaging at Oradell includes several full time veterinary technicians, a registered medical sonographer, and experienced veterinarians, board certified internists, surgeons, a cardiologist and a radiologist. Our staff is provided with advanced training and experience in diagnostic imaging. The specialized equipment available at our hospital ensures that accurate, non-invasive, diagnostic imaging is available when your pet needs it. CT scanning is also available to our patients through an arrangement with a near-by outpatient veterinary imaging facility.

Oradell Animal Hospital now has Digital Imaging Technology. This allows us to have the capability of viewing high resolution images to enable us to detect the slightest differences that can not be seen with traditional radiography. The images are stored like any computer file and can be viewed on a computer screen, transmitted electronically, or printed out on paper or transparent film similar to x-ray film. Computer software allows manipulation of the digital images to enhance viewing and diagnostic capabilities.

Digital imaging creates increased efficiency and better diagnostic analysis, and improves timely decisions about patient care.

My veterinarian believes that my pet needs a diagnostic imaging procedure. What should I do?

Most veterinarians perform radiographic (x-ray) imaging at their facilities. In some situations your veterinarian may choose to refer you to Oradell to take advantage of our advanced imaging services. You and your pet will first be referred to an individual veterinarian at Oradell to ensure the safest and most cost effective imaging procedures are performed specific to your pet’s individual situation and needs. Your primary veterinarian at Oradell will continue your pet’s diagnostic evaluation, supervise the diagnostic procedures, and communicate the results to you and your family veterinarian.


Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Doctors in Diagnostic Imaging / Radiology Services

Justin Goggin, DVM, DACVR (Radiology)

Dr. Goggin graduated from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at Kansas State University. He then completed a residency in radiology at Kansas State University. Dr. Goggin is board certified by the American College of Veterinary Radiology. Dr. Goggin enjoys spending his time with his wife and two sons and enjoys hiking, biking and canoeing.

 

Emergency/Critical Care Doctors

Call (201) 262-0010 for Emergency Service

emergency-critical care at oradell animal hospital

We understand how upsetting it is having a sick or injured pet and not being able to get help quickly. Our emergency services are here for you 7 days a week; 24 hours a day. Staff veterinarians along with technical support staff are on premises at all times working as a team with skill and compassion to respond to emergency calls during the hours your veterinarian is unavailable. We will stabilize your pet, perform any necessary diagnostic tests and continue treatment as needed. Your pet will be in the best possible hands so you can have peace of mind. Although an appointment is not needed, we ask that you telephone the hospital to alert us to your emergency so that we can prepare properly for your pet’s arrival. Some examples of emergency situations may include but are not restricted to: Trauma – car accidents, puncture wounds, eye trauma, bite wounds/animal fights, head injuries, airway obstruction, heatstroke, frostbite, trouble breathing, electric shock, snake bites, falling from high places Toxins/Poisons – chocolate, mushrooms, onions, plants, household cleansers, pool chemicals, human medications, coins, bones, rat poison, anti-freeze Disease/ Illness – profuse vomiting or diarrhea, vomiting blood or passing blood in stool or urine, seizures, listlessness, allergic reactions, inability/difficulty to urinate, refusal to eat, collapse, difficulty breathing Emergency Surgery – cesarean section, tracheotomies, urinary obstruction, abdominal/chest exploratory surgery, endoscopies, chest tube placement, bloating Your pet will be closely monitored as we provide the following advanced life support procedures as needed:

  1. Fluid therapy
  2. Oxygen therapy
  3. Pain management
  4. Blood Pressure monitoring
  5. Nutritional management
  6. Blood analysis and monitoring
  7. Cardiac resuscitation, defibrillation and post resuscitation care
  8. Continuous electrocardiogram
  9. Blood transfusions

What to expect when you come in for an emergency:

  • Call ahead if possible; our staff is on site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • If you suspect your pet has been exposed to a toxin; please bring us the container and/or a sample of the suspected toxin
  • Bring your pet’s medical records if available
  • At the hospital you will be greeted by a receptionist who will then have a trained technician evaluate your pet
  • If your pet needs to be admitted to the hospital the admitting doctor will discuss the projected diagnostics and/or therapeutic services and fees with you
  • Availability of board certified specialist for consultation when needed.

Hospitalization

Our staff doctors confer daily on all hospitalized cases, and your pet may be under the care of more than one doctor. You may call the hospital after 10:00AM Monday through Saturday and after 1:00PM on Sunday to check on your pet’s progress. Although the doctor may be unable to receive a phone call at that time, a summary of your pet’s condition will be available from the telephone receptionist. Before any patient is admitted to the hospital (unless it is an emergency situation), we ask that all vaccines be current and that the patient be free of ticks and fleas. If these requirements are not met, we must satisfy them at the owner’s expense. This is for the protection of your pet and hospitalized patients as well. Visitation Policy: Although we realize you may be anxious to visit your pet while hospitalized, visitation is done on a case by case basis. Visitation may not be recommended in order to avoid anxiety caused expectations of going home. In some cases these visits can lead to psychological or emotional trauma in your pet. In some instances the advantage of visitation outweighs the disadvantage and your veterinarian may permit you to visit your pet. These visits must be restricted to 10 minutes in length since we do not wish your pet’s treatment schedule to be interrupted or delayed by prolonged visitation.

Please make arrangements with your doctor for all visits with your pet. Visits are restricted to 10 minutes and are scheduled from 10:00 AM – 7:30 PM.

Communication with Your Veterinarian

A brief report will be faxed to your veterinarian when your pet is seen for emergency care. Your veterinarian will be updated through progress reports during your pet’s hospital stay as well as a detailed summary report upon discharge. Please follow up with your local veterinarian for continued care. Our technologically advanced equipment and the highly developed skills of our staff serve us in diagnosing and caring for critical and challenging cases. We are prepared to assist your veterinarian in the treatment of your ill or injured pet at any time.

 

General Medicine

Our general medicine veterinarians are highly skilled and trained to take special care of your pet from birth through their senior years. We perform all levels of service such as preventive medicine, diagnosis of disease, medical treatments and emergencies. Your general medicine veterinarian will work as a team with you and our board certified specialists to provide initial and follow up care 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Some of the more common problems our generalists see include diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, skin conditions, ear infections, urinary tract infections, allergic reactions, eye problems, obstetrical problems, cardiac conditions, infectious diseases such as tracheobronchitis or parvovirus infections and common orthopedic problems such as arthritis, ruptured ligaments, and lamenesses.

If you are referred to Oradell Animal Hospital to see a specialist or come for a second opinion, it is very important that you bring copies of your pet’s medical records and a history of past and current medications. This will avoid any unnecessary tests and expenses. We will accept faxed records, but we encourage you to make sure that they are legible.

Wellness and Preventive Medicine

Your pet’s health and well-being is our number one concern. A wellness examination gives us the chance to evaluate your pet’s overall health and to detect problems before they turn into serious illnesses. Because most pets age more quickly than you do, it is essential that your pet’s be examined at least once a year and as your pets get older, twice yearly. Additional testing may be recommended to diagnose a health problem. As part of the wellness examination a complete physical examination will be performed plus any routine screening tests that may be indicated. The early signs of heart disease can often be recognized during a routine health exam. Weight loss or gain since your pet’s last exam could indicate the early stages of a metabolic problem such as diabetes, kidney disease, thyroid disease, or obesity. Your pet’s ears will be examined since they can harbor parasites, bacteria, fungus and foreign materials.

Your pet’s eyes are a “window” to the body and will be examined to determine abnormalities, such as anemia, glaucoma, cataracts, high blood pressure, jaundice and allergies. Your pet’s oral cavity (gums, teeth, tongue and palate) will be checked for tartar buildup, dental abnormalities, fractures, loose teeth, tumors, infections and other problems. Your pet’s reproductive system will be examined for swellings, discharges, and breast lumps. If your pet has not been spayed or neutered, our veterinarian will explain the health benefits of doing so. Your pet’s skin and hair will be examined as a means of detecting allergies, infections, warts and tumors, fleas, ticks and other parasites. Your pet’s abdomen will be palpated to detect abnormalities such as enlarged organs or masses. Other painful areas may indicate problems with the intestines, kidneys, liver or other organs. Your pet’s joints, muscles and lymph nodes will be examined to detect the possible presence of inflammation, arthritis and tumors. REMEMBER… DOGS AND CATS CAN AGE MORE THAN SEVEN TIMES FASTER THAN PEOPLE!!!

Be sure to mention to your veterinarian any unusual behavior or symptoms your pet may be exhibiting.

  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Weight Loss
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive panting
  • Excessive scratching
  • Change in appetite
  • Excessive urination
  • Excessive thirst

How To Pill Your Dog

 

Disease Prevention

Vaccination against infectious diseases has tremendous effects on reducing illness in your pet. At Oradell Animal Hospital, we will create a vaccination program based on your pet’s lifestyle and exposure to disease. Core vaccines are generally recommended for all cats and dogs. For cats, core vaccines include panleukopenia, rabies, calicivirus and herpesvirus. For dogs, core vaccines include distemper, rabies, parvovirus, adenovirus and bordatella. Certain vaccines or non-core vaccines are administered to your pet depending upon exposure, risk and lifestyle. For cats this includes vaccines that protect against leukemia virus. For dogs, this includes vaccines that protect against Lyme Disease and Leptospirosis. If you are interested in viewing Oradell Animal Hospital’s Vaccination Protocols and Parasite Prevention Protocol, please click here.

Senior Wellness: Seniors Deserve Special Health Care

When your dog or cat reaches eight years of age (giant breeds five years of age) your pet is entering the “senior years” of his/her life. While the aging process is not a disease in and of itself, the physiological changes that accompany aging may predispose a pet to one or more disease processes. Older animals are more likely to develop multiple health problems.

Twice a year health visits are highly recommended for dogs once they reach eight years of age. Knowing what changes to expect can help you explain the health concerns of your senior pet to your veterinarian which will help the doctor decide on the need for appropriate testing.

10 Steps Towards Senior Health

  1. Visit your veterinarian for a senior health care exam at least every six months to monitor your pet’s health.
  2. As your pet approaches senior status, we recommend basic blood work to serve as a baseline for measuring future changes.
  3. Note changes in behavior or appearance and see your veterinarian. Get problems under control before they become major problems requiring more extensive treatment.
  4. Switch to a high quality senior food that provides enhanced levels of key nutrients. If you have specific concerns or your pet has medical issues, nutritional counseling can be arranged.
  5. Ask your veterinarian to check your dog’s teeth regularly and follow his/her recommendations.
  6. Provide moderate exercise. This will help with weight control and keep muscles toned.
  7. Talk with your veterinarian if your dog or cat tires easily or has trouble breathing.
  8. Groom your pet at least once each week. Check for lumps, sores, parasites or discharges from the eyes, ears and nose.
  9. Maintain a familiar routine and environment to minimize stress.
  10. If your pet has not been neutered or spayed, have your veterinarian examine the mammary glands or prostate gland.

If you notice that your pet becomes less active due to aging and decreased muscle tone, Oradell Animal Hospital offers physical rehabilitation services.

Dermatology Services

Skin diseases are common problems in dogs and cats. Some of the most common problems are skin infections, ear infections, allergies, and external parasites. We offer a wide array of diagnostic procedures such as skin scrapings, fungal and bacterial cultures, cytology, biopsy, and allergy testing (both serum and intradermal). We stock a wide variety of limited antigen (hypoallergenic) diets for pets with food allergies. Allergen specific immunotherapy (allergy shots) is often recommended for pets diagnosed with non-seasonal allergies.

Pain Management

Our priority is to enhance the well-being of our patients. It is our goal to recognize, prevent and minimize both physical and emotional pain and to ensure that your pet is comfortable after surgical procedures. We will dispense medication for comfort when your pet is discharged from the hospital as well. We have a separate area for our feline friends offering them a stress- free environment that is quiet and comfortable. How can I tell when my pet is in pain? Response to pain varies among individual patients. Your dog or cat may still wag their tail or purr during human interaction. Be aware of the following behaviors/symptons:

  • Slight limping
  • Trembling
  • Shaking
  • Licking or chewing at a painful area
  • Sitting or lying in an abnormal position; not curled up looking relaxed or comfortable
  • May or may not appear interested in food
  • Looks depressed
  • Frequent whining
  • Eliminates without attempting to move
  • Dilated pupils

Microchip Placement

To microchip your pet, simply call to make an appointment. This is a safe, simple and permanent form of pet identification designed to quickly identify lost pets and reunite them with their owners. Similar to administering a routine injection, within seconds a microchip with a unique identification code is implanted under the skin between the shoulder blades of your pet. Once your pet is microchipped, you must fill out the enrollment form enclosed with the microchip. The information will then be stored with a service database and is always available. If your pet is ever lost, he/she can be scanned at animal shelters or veterinary clinics to reveal their identification number.

 

Internal Medicine

The Department of Internal Medicine consists of four board certified internists and a specialized technical support staff.

Diagnostic services include:

  • Ultrasonography
  • Endoscopic examinations of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract and the nasal passages
  • Biopsies

Therapeutic services include:

  • Chemotherapy for selected tumors
  • Radioactive iodine treatment for cats with hyperthyroidism
  • Intravenous nutrition for animals too ill to eat
  • Treatments for Cushing’s disease
  • Treatments for Addison’s disease
  • Canine hypothyroidism
  • Diabetic Stabilization

Our internists integrate their care with neurology, oncology, cardiology, surgery, and the critical care unit to function as a team in order to provide the best possible medical and surgical care to all of our patients.

LEPTOSPIROSIS UPDATE FROM THE MEDICINE TEAM AT

THE ORADELL ANIMAL HOSPITAL

Left to right back row: Dr. Laura Lee Sartor, Dr. Mary Ann Crawford

Left to right front row: Dr. Deb Hall, Dr. Dara Zerrenner

 

What is leptospirosis?

Leptospirosis is a serious bacterial disease caused by multiple strains (serovars) of the bacteria, which are passed in the urine of multiple species of animals.  It is a known zoonotic disease.  This disease is found worldwide, although strains vary from country to country.  The “carriers” of the bacteria (most commonly rats, raccoons, horses, and cows) vary and are often not sick from the disease.  Unvaccinated dogs are also likely one of the common carriers in our area.  There have been an extraordinary number of dogs afflicted with this bacterial disease in the Northern New Jersey region in the last year, most likely because of our very wet weather pattern.   The bacteria persist in areas of standing water such as ponds – either ornamental or natural ponds, mud puddles, or water collecting on tarps.  It also hides in warm, wet, shaded areas of lawns or forests.

 

What does a zoonotic disease mean?

Zoonotic diseases are diseases transmitted from animals to humans.  The disease is spread in the urine of the infected animals.  If your pet has been diagnosed with leptospirosis, you should follow your veterinarian’s recommendations about the handling of the pet’s urine.  You should consult your own physician regarding exposure to the disease from your pet.

 

How does my pet get this disease?

Dogs become infected by leptospires when abraded skin comes in contact with infected urine, water contaminated by infected urine, or moist soil contaminated by infected urine.  Also the organism can gain access to the animal through drinking the urine or contaminated water.

 

What kind of symptoms occur with leptospirosis and what treatments can be given?

Leptospirosis progresses fairly quickly once animals are exposed to the bacterium.  Symptoms often can be very serious and usually include one or more of the following: increased thirst and urination, decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and jaundice (yellow coloration to the skin).  These are usually the result of acute kidney and/or liver failure.  This is a very treatable disease.  Although antibiotics are effective at killing the Leptospira bacteria, intensive supportive care is often needed to help preserve organ function and give patients the best possible outcome. Most patients require a 3-5 day hospitalization stay to help them get over the acute phase of the disease.  With early intervention, the majority of disease cases have a good outcome with up to 70-80% of dogs making a full recovery.  However, some cases do not respond to appropriate therapy despite all efforts.

 

What should I do about leptospirosis and my dog?

It is very important that you keep your dog away from wet areas where the organism is found in the highest numbers.  If you have a lot of shading in your yard, you should consider getting sun to those areas to eliminate moist soil which we know can be permanently contaminated if not dried out.

You should also consider having your dog immunized with a Leptospira vaccine if that has already not been performed.  The currently available vaccines provide effective protection against the most common serovars of Leptospira.   Vaccinations begin as a series of two, and then boosted yearly.

 

Hospice/Palliative Care

Compassionate Animal Relief to End Suffering (C.A.R.E.S)

“It’s like having an animal hospital in your pocket.” – Barb Urquhart (see Tucker’s story in “Our Stories”)

The Oradell CARES Program specifically addresses the medical needs of pets that have been diagnosed with either a chronic progressive and debilitating disease or a terminal disease where a clear and definable need for extensive home care exists. Our goal is not to prolong suffering, but to offer outpatient and/or in-home consultation in order to assist our clients during this difficult process. We believe that this modality of treatment begins when there is a shift from attempting to cure the illness to providing comfort for a pet that cannot be cured.

Our Services

The OAH CARES Team consists of a select group of doctors and technicians with a special interest in hospice care.

  • An Oradell Animal Hospital veterinarian will discuss your beliefs, needs and goals for your pet during an initial consultation at our hospital.
  • We will then develop a comprehensive Individualized Care Plan (ICP) to address your pet’s disease, nutrition, pain, palliative treatment, and end-of-life plan. You can then choose to review your pet’s ICP with your Oradell Animal Hospital veterinarian at a follow-up visit in your home.
  • Our specially trained technicians will follow your treatment plan by making subsequent visits to your home based upon the individual needs of your pet.
  • Our treatment services will focus on supportive care such as wound and pain management, nutritional support and hydration, and rehabilitation tools to aid with ambulation. We are also available to help educate you through the use of our library, and will loan resources to you for your “in-home” use.
  • We will refer our patients, when appropriate, to specialty groups within our hospital to address specific questions or concerns.
  • We will provide you with a privileged Oradell CARES check-in phone service. Our team will be available to address non-emergent questions and provide support for our Oradell CARES patients 24 hours a day/7 days a week. We are also available via email for added convenience.
  • We pledge that the Oradell Animal Hospital will  provide efficient in-hospital emergency care,
    24 hours a day/7 days a week for any pet that may experience a life-threatening symptom that would require immediate emergency assistance to relieve suffering.
  • Our end-of-life services will include the option of “in-home” euthanasia.
  • We work closely with renowned psychotherapist and licensed social worker, Susan Stone, MSW, LCSW.  Ms. Stone facilitates a unique Caregiver Support Group to assist our Cares Program clients during the often stressful and difficult process of caring for a chronically ill pet. She also provides additional bereavement support in a group or on an individual basis.

Read: Hospice & Palliative Care FAQs

Read: Our Stories

 

Iodine 131 Therapy

Guide to Radioiodine Treatment for Feline Hyperthyroidism at Oradell Animal Hospital

WHAT IS HYPERTHYROIDISM?

Hyperthyroidism is a clinical condition resulting from the excessive production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland. It is common in middle-age to older cats. In fact, greater than 95% of the cases occur in cats over 8 years of age. It is usually due to benign changes (hyperplasia or adenomas) in the thyroid gland. Cancer of the thyroid gland can occur but it is rare.

WHAT ARE SIGNS OF HYPERTHYROIDISM?

Thyroid hormone affects every organ system, so signs can be variable. The most common clinical signs include weight loss, increased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, drinking and urinating more, and nervousness or hyperactivity. Thyroid hormone affects the heart, causing fast heart rates, heart murmurs, abnormal heart beats, and high blood pressure.

HOW CAN HYPERTHYROIDISM BE TREATED?

Three forms of therapy are available. These include:

  1. Anti-thyroid drugs such as methimazole (Tapazole®) or ipodate.
  2. Surgical removal of the thyroid glands.
  3. Radioactive iodine (I131).

HOW DOES RADIOACTIVE IODINE WORK?

Iodine is normally taken up by the thyroid gland. One form of iodine, I131, is radioactive. When I131 enters the thyroid gland it destroys the abnormally functioning cells. This reduces the size of the gland and its ability to produce thyroid hormone. I131 is administered to hyperthyroid cats by a subcutaneous injection. Cats treated with radioactive iodine need to be hospitalized for 4-7 days following the injection. This is when they are most radioactive. Their level of radioactivity is checked daily with a Geiger counter and only when it reaches an acceptably low level can they go home.

HOW EFFECTIVE IS RADIOIODINE THERAPY FOR FELINE HYPERTHYROIDISM?

In a recent study of 524 hyperthyroid cats treated with radioiodine, the overall response to treatment was considered good in 94% of the cats. 8/524 (1.5%) remained hyperthyroid 6 months following treatment, requiring additional therapy. 13/524 (2.5%) had a relapse of hyperthyroidism 1-6.5 years after the initial treatment.

IS RADIOIODINE TREATMENT SAFE?

Radioiodine treatment has been used in human medicine for over 50 years and is recognized as a safe and effective method of treating human patients with hyperthyroidism. Studies in humans have shown no increased risk of developing leukemia, thyroid cancer, or other cancers after treatment with radioiodine. In a recent study of 524 hyperthyroid cats treated with radioiodine, the only adverse sign was problems swallowing in 8/524 (1.5%) cats. This problem resolved rapidly without treatment.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF MY CAT BECOMING HYPOTHYROID?

Hypothyroidism (the opposite of hyperthyroidism) is a condition resulting from a deficiency of thyroid hormones. Clinical signs include lethargy, dullness, obesity, oily skin, and matted fur. In a recent study of 524 hyperthyroid cats treated with radioiodine, only 11/524 (2.1%) developed hypothyroidism and required thyroid hormone supplementation.

IS THERE ANY INCREASED RISK IN TREATING MY CAT FOR HYPERTHRYODISM IF THERE ARE OTHER HEALTH PROBLEMS LIKE CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE?

Because hyperthyroidism is seen in middle-age to older cats and may affect any organ system, it is not unusual for a hyperthyroid cat to have other health problems. Chronic kidney disease and heart disease are important concerns in these patients. Therefore, careful evaluation of hyperthyroid cats is recommended. A complete blood workup, including tests evaluating kidney and liver function, a urinalysis, a thoracic radiograph to evaluate the heart and check for cancer, and blood pressure measurement are performed in the initial evaluation of hyperthyroid cats prior to treatment. These tests help give a better understanding of each individual hyperthyroid patient’s specific needs.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM MY CAT TO PEOPLE AND OTHER PETS?

The dose of radioiodine used to treat hyperthyroid cats is very small and people and other animals are at very low risk from the radiation. Treated cats are hospitalized until they reach an acceptably low level of radioactivity. However, they will be radioactive (to some degree) for 82 days following treatment. Radioactivity does decrease rapidly over time and distance.

STEPS TO MINIMIZE ANY UNNECESSARY RADIATION EXPOSURE TO OTHERS

  1. For the first 2-3 weeks, try to maintain an arm’s length distance (~3-6 feet) from your treated cat whenever possible and especially if you will be with it for long periods of time. Avoid sleeping with your cat for the first 2-3 weeks.
  2. Wash your hands carefully after handling your cat, its food dishes, or litter pan.
  3. A treated cat will excrete low levels of radioactive iodine in its urine for several weeks. Wear disposable plastic gloves when changing the litter and disposable plastic litter pan liners to minimize handling the litter. Change the litter daily and try to prevent tracking of litter away from the box. Place all contents in a plastic bag and keep it out of the normal trash (store outside your home) for 3 weeks, and then you can dispose of it with your regular trash.
  4. Keep your treated cat confined indoors for 82 days. Do not allow your cat to go outside and roam freely in the neighborhood.
  5. Children under the age of 18 years and pregnant women should not have any prolonged or close contact with your treated cat.
  6. Contact us with any problems or questions regarding the treatment and home care of your cat.

PLEASE NOTE: ONCE WE HAVE SCHEDULED THE I-131 TREATMENT, WE WILL ORDER THE I-131. THIS ORDER CAN ONLY BE CANCELLED BY THE FRIDAY BEFORE THE SCHEDULED TREATMENT.

Treatment Options

Medical treatment consists of giving oral medication two or three times daily for the remainder of the cat’s life. The medication does not cure the disease; it merely controls the release of thyroid hormone. There is an incidence of side effects such as vomiting, diarrhea, poor appetite, and skin lesions. Missed medication will result in relapses. Surgical removal of the affected thyroid gland(s) will cure the disease, however, there are risks of anesthesia and surgical complications in older and often frail cats.

Radioactive iodine (I-131) therapy is the treatment of choice, because it is safe and effective. With just one subcutaneous injection and hospitalization for four days, 98% of affected cats are cured of the disease. Our staff is on site 24 hours a day monitoring the patients in our large, sunny Nuclear Medicine Ward.

 
Baci
 
Casey
Baci underwent I-131 treatment and is doing so well. Everyone at Oradell Animal Hospital was wonderful and took great care of him!   Casey Flora, a patient of Dr. Laura Eirmann, underwent 1-131 treatment for hyperthyroidism. Before his treatment he had an excessive appetite and although he was eating well he was losing a lot of weight. Since his therapy, he is happy and at his normal healthy weight.
 
Mickey and Gizzie
 
Alaska
Mickey, on the left, is happy to have Gizzie home. Gizzie just underwent I-131 treatment and is doing great! Gizzie says thanks to Dr. Shah.   Before Alaska’s I-131 treatment, she was very skinny and her eyes looked like they were wide open all the time. She had a funny smell and was shedding more than usual. Since her treatment she has gained her weight back, her eyes look normal and her coat is much fuller.

 

Laboratory Services

In addition to the exceptional level of care and extensive services that are offered at the Oradell Animal Hospital, we also provide state of the art laboratory services.

Although a large amount of our laboratory work is performed at an outside reference laboratory, thoroughly trained in-house laboratory personnel are available to perform testing that will enable a patient to go safely to surgery or to aid with early disease detection.

A proud member of the Veterinary Laboratory Association Quality Assurance Program since 2004, our in-house laboratory has been granted proficiency awards for testing in Chemistry, Hematology, Parasitology and Urinalysis.

Oradell Animal Hospital Wins Distinction of Honor for Quality Control in Laboratory Testing.

 

Laser Therapy

A Drug-free, surgery-free alternative to pain relief

What is Laser Therapy?  A surgery-free, drug-free, noninvasive treatment to:

REDUCE PAIN

REDUCE INFLAMMATION

SPEED UP THE HEALING PROCESS

How does it work?  The laser uses a beam of light to deeply penetrate tissue without damaging it.  The laser light is delivered through a noninvasive hand piece to treat the affected area.  Laser energy induces a biological response in the cells called “photo-bio-modulation”, which leads to reduced pain, reduced inflammation, and increased healing speed.

Your pet may feel a gentle and soothing warmth.  Most treatments take a matter of minutes.

What are the costs? Treatment protocols are unique to each patient and condition.  Therefore, treatments will vary in time, complexity, and cost.  Laser Therapy can be used to enhance other treatment plans that we recommend.

Laser Therapy has been scientifically proven to be successful in treating post-surgical pain and many acute and chronic conditions.

Acute Conditions:  Wounds, allergies, infections, cuts/bites, inflammations, tooth extraction pain relief, sprains, strains & fractures, post-surgical healing and pain relief.

Chronic Conditions:  Degenerative joint disease, inflammatory bowel disease, periodontal disease, lick granulomas, geriatric care, hip dysplasia, feline acne, tendonitis, arthritis, otitis,  And more……

 

If you would like a consultation or appointment, please call 201-262-0010.

 

Neurology

Oradell Animal Hospital Neurology department Oradell Animal Hospital Neurology Department

There are numerous diseases of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves which are seen in companion animals.  Our hospital’s Neurology Service has the expertise to diagnose and treat a wide range of neurological diseases from seizure disorders, to spinal pain and weakness or paralysis, to tumors and inflammatory diseases such as encephalitis.  Using MRI imaging, electrodiagnostic testing and specialized laboratory testing, our neurologists are able to customize a diagnostic and treatment program to treat a constellation of neurological diseases.  A state of the art neurosurgery suite is available for surgical intervention by any of our neurologists.  The Neurology Service is available six days a week for consultation, diagnostic testing and treatment including MRI imaging and neurosurgery.

 

Nutrition

Dr. Laura_Eirmann and Patient

All nutrition consultations require an office visit with you and your pet. Please call 201-262-0010 to schedule your nutrition consultation. We do not offer on-line or phone consultation. The diet history form is provided below. This form must be completed and sent to our hospital at least 1 week before your nutrition consultation appointment.

Download/Print: Diet and Nutrition History Form (word document)

Nutrition Counseling

Oradell Animal Hospital offers counseling in dietary selection and feeding practices for cats and dogs during various life stages such as growth, gestation and lactation. This includes “special considerations” of large breed puppies and senior pets.

We also offer consultation in dietary selection and feeding practices for cats and dogs with specific disease conditions in which nutritional intervention plays a role in disease management. Such diseases include:

  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Renal (kidney) disease
  • Urolithiasis (kidney/bladder stones)
  • Gastrointestinal disease
  • Critical Care (utilization of feeding tubes and intravenous nutrition)
  • Dietary hypersensitivities
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Neoplasia (tumors and cancers)
  • Dental health
  • Multiple disease conditions

We do not formulate raw diets

Weight Management Program:

Oradell Animal Hospital can assist you in structuring a proper weight management program for your pet. If you have an appointment for a nutrition consultation, please click the link below and fill out the form before coming to your session.

Obesity: A Growing Concern for Our Pets

Losing weight is on the top of many resolution lists. Did you realize that your pet may need to shed a few pounds as well? Many veterinary surveys indicate that at least 1/3 and perhaps close to ½ of the cats and dogs in the US are overweight or obese making this the most frequent form of malnutrition seen at the Oradell Animal Hospital. Being a bit chubby is more than a cosmetic issue for our pets. As with people, carrying even just a bit of excessive weight can have serious consequences. Animals above a lean ideal body weight have increased risk of many medical conditions including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, respiratory diseases, constipation, pancreatitis, feline hepatic lipidosis (a serious liver condition), and feline lower urinary tract disease. Extra body fat puts excessive stress on joints which may worsen osteoarthritis. In addition, obese pets can be an increased anesthesia risk. In fact, it has been shown that dogs who maintained lean their entire lives live longer than overweight dogs. But, how can you tell if your pet is overweight? Body weight is somewhat helpful especially if you know what you pet has weighed in the past…look for changes since those pounds can creep up over time. Ask your veterinarian to show you how to do a body condition score. This simple “score” rates your pet on a scale from 1-9 with 1 being too thin, 4-5 being ideal, and 6 and above being overweight. The pet with an “ideal score” will have ribs that can be easily felt, a waist (or indentation behind the rib cage) when viewed from above and a nice “tummy tuck” when viewed from above. If you pet is overweight, there are many things you can do to help him get back into shape. Speaking with your veterinarian is the first place to start. For some pets, feeding a diet formulated for weight loss and carefully selecting lower calories treats can help. Increasing exercise as appropriate for you pet may be helpful. The Oradell Animal Hospital Nutrition Service also offers a comprehensive six month weight loss program which includes monthly weight-ins and consultation to help you and your pet on the road to a healthier life. You can schedule an initial weight loss consultation by calling the hospital for an appointment with the nutrition service.

Pet Owner Resources

Recommendations on Selecting Pet Foods The Savvy Dog Owners Guide: Nutrition on the Internet The Savvy Cat Owners Guide: Nutrition on the Internet

 

Oncology

It is upsetting to suspect or learn that your pet has cancer. The Oncology service at Oradell Animal Hospital is here to support you. We understand your concerns and will work tirelessly to help you through this difficult time.

Our focus is to provide you with an accurate diagnosis, apprise you of all the various treatment options, and ensure that all of your questions are answered. By working closely with the Surgery and Internal Medicine departments, we can determine the type and extent of the cancer in your individual pet so that a treatment plan that is best suited to your pet’s needs can be developed.

Services include:

  • Diagnostic imaging – Radiography, Ultrasound, MRI
  • Bone marrow aspirates
  • Biopsies
  • Nutritional Support
  • Chemotherapy administration

Diseases treated include:

  • Lymphoma and leukemia
  • Mast cell tumors and other skin tumors
  • Bladder tumors (e.g. transitional cell carcinoma)
  • Splenic tumors (e.g. hemangiosarcoma)
  • Bone tumors (e.g. osteosarcoma)
  • Soft tissue sarcomas
  • Vaccine-associated sarcomas
  • Mammary tumors
  • Intestinal tract tumors (from mouth to anal sacs, including liver)
  • Respiratory tract tumors (from nose to lungs)
  • Histiocytic tumors

If you would like to have your pet evaluated by the oncology department, please contact the front desk to make an appointment. If you or your veterinarian feels that your pet is critical and cannot wait for an appointment, your pet can be admitted through the emergency service, 24 hours a day and will then be evaluated by the oncology department when they are in the hospital.

Link here to Bergen Record news: The Treatment of Canine Lymphoma

Conditionally Licensed Monoclonal Antibody +
CCNU Chemotherapy for Dogs with T-Cell Lymphoma

Dr. Dennis Bailey and Dr. Steven Brenn of our oncology service are currently enrolling cases in a nationwide clinical trial to evaluate a monoclonal antibody (AT-005) that is conditionally licensed by the USDA to aid in the treatment of dogs with lymphoma. The study is designed to assess the benefit of adding AT-005 to a single-agent CCNU chemotherapy protocol for dogs with intermediate to high grade T-cell lymphoma.

CLINICAL STUDY DETAILS

Trial Summary

An estimated 60 client-owned dogs will be enrolled
in this study. During the first 5 weeks of the study, all enrolled dogs will receive single-agent CCNU chemotherapy. After two cycles of CCNU treatment, dogs that achieve a partial or complete response will be randomized equally (1:1) to receive AT-005 or placebo twice a week for the next 4 weeks. The veterinary oncologist performing the dogs’ evaluations will be blinded to each dog’s group assignment. Patients will continue to receive the monoclonal antibody or placebo every other week for another 8 weeks, after which they will be rechecked monthly. The study duration is 12 months; however, if progressive disease occurs before the 12-month visit, dogs will be removed from the study at that time.

Trial Funding

Dogs presenting to the participating trial site will
be screened for enrollment. The pet owner will be financially responsible for the initial consultation, bloodwork/urinanalysis, and thoracic radiographs. A lymph node biopsy and flow cytometry analysis will be performed at no cost to the owner. Once the dog
is confirmed eligible (non-indolent, T-cell lymphoma), all procedures and treatments required by the study including chemotherapy, antibody therapy, exam, bloodwork, and other required diagnostics will be fully funded. Previous studies with this monoclonal antibody have shown that side effects tend to be minimal, but the study will pay up to $1,200 for medical management of side effects that may occur, either as a result of chemotherapy or AT-005 treatment.

Trial Eligibility

To qualify for enrollment, dogs must meet the following criteria:

  • Client-owned dog > 1 year of age
  • Body weight at least 10 kg
  • Biopsy and flow cytometry confirmation of naïve, 
intermediate or high grade T-cell lymphoma
  • Stage II or higher
  • At least one peripherally located lymph node 
measuring ≥ 2 cm longest diameter
  • Performance Score of 0, 1 or 2 [0 = normal activity; 
1 = restricted activity: decreased activity from
pre disease status; 2 = compromised, ambulatory only for vital activities, consistently defecates and urinates in acceptable areas]

Dogs cannot be enrolled if any of the following conditions are met:

  • Glucocorticoid therapy for more than 7 days prior to enrollment
  • Prior chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or molecular- targeted therapy
  • ALT ≥ 2x upper limit of normal at enrollment
  • Any serious medical condition (including other 
concurrent malignancy) that may be disruptive to 
the intent and objectives of the study
  • Dog is pregnant or likely to become pregnant
  • Dog is participating in another study
  • Dog may not be available for the entire study 
duration

 

Ophthalmology

Drs. Michael Brown and Brad Holmberg of Veterinary Ophthalmology Services, Inc. (VOS), are now providing ophthalmology clinical services at Oradell Animal Hospital.

Drs. Brown and Holmberg are Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology and bring extensive experience and expertise in medical and surgical ophthalmology to Oradell Animal Hospital. Procedures offered by their services include but are not limited to indolent ulcer treatment (keratotomy/corneal adhesive/contact lens replacement), gonioscopy, slit-lamp examination of the anterior segment, indirect ophthalmoscopy, applanation tonometry and CERF exams. Surgical procedures will be performed at the Veterinary Referral Centre in Little Falls, NJ.

Drs. Brown and Holmberg will work closely with owners and referring veterinarians to provide timely updates on the status, diagnostic results and therapeutic options of referred patients. They will continue the high level of expertise and care that you expect from Oradell Animal Hospital.

 

Pharmacy

In order for our pharmacy to dispense medication for your pet, it must have been seen within a 12 month period. We cannot dispense prescription products without a chart, exam and an authorized prescription from your veterinarian.

Our pharmacy also dispenses prescription diets for our patients and can answer your questions regarding these diets. We do not carry non-prescription pet foods. All prescription diets require a written prescription from a veterinarian on our staff.

The Oradell Animal Hospital does not deal directly with internet or catalog pharmacies. We are happy to provide you with an authorized prescription which you can use at your pharmacy of choice including internet pharmacies.

The Oradell Animal Hospital pharmacy dispenses medications for:

  • Outpatients
  • Discharged “in-hospital” patients, and
  • Medication refills for our clients

Pharmacy Hours:

Monday – Friday 9:00AM – 9:30PM
Saturday 9:00AM – 5:30PM
Sundays 9:00AM – 5:00PM Emergencies Only.

A 24 hour advance notice is required in order to have your prescription filled. If you call in your prescription after hours or during the weekend, please allow 48 hours for us to handle your request.

 

Physical Rehabilation

Oradell Animal Hospital offers physical rehabilitation services to our patients, as well as to referral patients from other veterinarians.

We offer various methods of therapy beneficial to patients recovering from orthopedic and neurological surgeries involving bones and joints, the spine, and soft tissues such as tendons, ligaments, and muscles. Dogs with hip dysplasia, other arthritic conditions, and musculoskeletal injuries are also prime candidates for rehabilitation, in addition to patients suffering with degenerative neurological diseases.

Physical rehabilitation helps restore function more quickly and efficiently, and with substantially decreased pain during the recovery process.

Types of therapy include:

  • Underwater treadmill
  • Therapeutic Ultrasound
  • Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation
  • Therapeutic Exercise Aids
  • Acupuncture
  • Laser Therapy

Indications for physical rehabilitation include:

  • Post-surgical recovery
  • Musculoskeletal injury
  • Chronic arthritis
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Neuromuscular conditions
  • Poor mobility
  • Conditioning
  • Obesity

Benefits include:

  • Decreased pain
  • Increased mobility and flexibility
  • Quicker recovery and healing time
  • Non-invasive treatments

Acupuncture

Cyrus is a 12 year old black Labradore Retriever who came in to the hospital with chronic neck pain. After 4 acupuncture treatments he was able to resume normal activity level including longer walks with his owner.

Veterinary acupuncture is an ancient technique of placing needles into special points, called acupoints, in order to affect the flow of qi (pronounced “chee”). Traditional Chinese Medicine describes qi as energy in the body. Qi flows along channels, or meridians, similarly to how a car moves along a winding highway. By western definition, the patient benefits from needle placement along these meridians through stimulation of certain local biochemical substances that can control pain and inflammation, improve circulation, and stimulate the immune system. Acupuncture is used in a variety of ways, but the most common way is to improve pain control in patients suffering from degenerative joint disease, such as arthritis. The technique can also be used to improve strength, comfort, and neurologic function with intervertebral disc disease, control of nausea or vomiting associated with cancer or illness, stimulation of appetite, increased level of energy or awareness, management of behavioral conditions, and control of other symptoms such as incontinence or weakness. Dr. Heather Troyer, our certified acupuncturist is now offering acupuncture services and Traditional Chinese Medical consultations at our hospital.

Her goal is to improve the quality of life in pets through integration of both conventional and holistic medical options.

Laser Therapy

A Drug-free, surgery-free alternative to pain relief What is Laser Therapy? A surgery-free, drug-free, noninvasive treatment to: REDUCE PAIN REDUCE INFLAMMATION SPEED UP THE HEALING PROCESS How does it work? The laser uses a beam of light to deeply penetrate tissue without damaging it. The laser light is delivered through a noninvasive hand piece to treat the affected area. Laser energy induces a biological response in the cells called “photo-bio-modulation”, which leads to reduced pain, reduced inflammation, and increased healing speed. Your pet may feel a gentle and soothing warmth. Most treatments take a matter of minutes. What are the costs? Treatment protocols are unique to each patient and condition. Therefore, treatments will vary in time, complexity, and cost. Laser Therapy can be used to enhance other treatment plans that we recommend. Laser Therapy has been scientifically proven to be successful in treating post-surgical pain and many acute and chronic conditions. Acute Conditions: Wounds, allergies, infections, cuts/bites, inflammations, tooth extraction pain relief, sprains, strains & fractures, post-surgical healing and pain relief. Chronic Conditions: Degenerative joint disease, inflammatory bowel disease, periodontal disease, lick granulomas, geriatric care, hip dysplasia, feline acne, tendonitis, arthritis, otitis, And more……

 

If you would like a consultation or appointment, please call 201-262-0010.

 
Our dog Shadow has been a patient at Oradell Animal Hospital Veterinary Group of Hasbrouck Heights and the Oradell Animal Hospital, Paramus since he was a puppy. Shadow is now 12 years old. He is a wonderful, caring dog, the best of the best. Shadow is a Golden Retriever, who developed arthritis at age 7. It started to affect him badly at age 10. Shadow was very fortunate because his brother, a yellow lab named Mickey, was one of the first dogs to be treated at the Oradell Animal Hospital physical rehabilitation facility. The water treadmill was an instant hit! Mickey, who is no longer with us, had severe problems with his legs. There is no doubt in our minds that Mickey lived much longer and much more comfortably because of Oradell Animal Hospital’s program.

The staff in the physical rehabilitation department show love and attention to Shadow as if he were their own! He rushes into their arms when he sees them. He then happily walks to the “pool” with them. This team is the best! They are considered part of our family. We highly recommend this therapy for any dog who is a candidate. We swear by it. Shadow has less pain due to his therapy and a much higher quality of life than he would have had without it!! Michele Meli, Shadow’s owner

 

Radiology

Diagnostic Imaging Services available at Oradell Animal Hospital include ultrasound, and ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy procedures, MRI, radiology (x-ray imaging and radiographic contrast studies) and fluoroscopy (moving picture/real time x-ray imaging). Diagnostic imaging services are used by all services of the hospital for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with all types of disease conditions. The staff involved with diagnostic imaging at Oradell includes several full time veterinary technicians, a registered medical sonographer, and experienced veterinarians, board certified internists, surgeons, a cardiologist and a radiologist. Our staff is provided with advanced training and experience in diagnostic imaging. The specialized equipment available at our hospital ensures that accurate, non-invasive, diagnostic imaging is available when your pet needs it. CT scanning is also available to our patients through an arrangement with a near-by outpatient veterinary imaging facility.

Oradell Animal Hospital now has Digital Imaging Technology. This allows us to have the capability of viewing high resolution images to enable us to detect the slightest differences that can not be seen with traditional radiography. The images are stored like any computer file and can be viewed on a computer screen, transmitted electronically, or printed out on paper or transparent film similar to x-ray film. Computer software allows manipulation of the digital images to enhance viewing and diagnostic capabilities.

Digital imaging creates increased efficiency and better diagnostic analysis, and improves timely decisions about patient care.

My veterinarian believes that my pet needs a diagnostic imaging procedure. What should I do?

Most veterinarians perform radiographic (x-ray) imaging at their facilities. In some situations your veterinarian may choose to refer you to Oradell to take advantage of our advanced imaging services. You and your pet will first be referred to an individual veterinarian at Oradell to ensure the safest and most cost effective imaging procedures are performed specific to your pet’s individual situation and needs. Your primary veterinarian at Oradell will continue your pet’s diagnostic evaluation, supervise the diagnostic procedures, and communicate the results to you and your family veterinarian.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Doctors in Diagnostic Imaging / Radiology Services

Justin Goggin, DVM, DACVR (Radiology)

Dr. Goggin graduated from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at Kansas State University. He then completed a residency in radiology at Kansas State University. Dr. Goggin is board certified by the American College of Veterinary Radiology. Dr. Goggin enjoys spending his time with his wife and two sons and enjoys hiking, biking and canoeing.

 

Surgery

The Department of surgical services was established over 40 years ago by Dr. Anthony Palminteri, founder of Oradell Animal Hospital and followed shortly thereafter by co-owner Dr. William Stockman. Drs. Palminteri and Stockman received specialized surgical training at the ASPCA’s Henry Bergh Memorial Hospital in New York City, and Dr. Palminteri was among the first group of veterinary surgeons to be certified by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) in 1968.

Today, Oradell Animal Hospital has three board certified surgeons on staff who maintain the highest surgical standards while performing the latest techniques in soft tissue and orthopedic surgery. Our state-of-the-art facility contains special surgical suites dedicated to general, orthopedic, and cardiovascular surgeries, laparoscopy and arthrosocopy.

Tibial tuberosity advancement for the treatment of tearing of the cranial cruciate ligament in dogs.

Tearing of the cranial (or anterior) cruciate ligament CrCL in dogs commonly occurs in middle aged, overweight dogs, but we have seen it in dogs as young as 10 months old.  The limp or lameness can happen suddenly or it can wax and wane for months.  Anti-inflammatory medications will help the knee to feel better, but in dogs over 15 to 20 pounds, surgery is required to achieve the best possible outcome.  In medium to large breed dogs the treatment of choice at Oradell Animal Hospital is tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA).  At the time of surgery, the knee joint (or in dogs the stifle joint) is examined either in the traditional open method or with arthroscopy to assess the integrity of the CrCL and remove any damaged portion.  The joint is also inspected for degree of arthritis and the medial meniscus is examined because 1/3 of dogs with a CrCL tear will also tear the meniscus.  Then, instead of trying to replace the ligament, the forces around the knee are adjusted by moving the front of the lower bone (tibia) forward to stabilize the joint.  This action eliminates the force pushing the tibia forward when the CrCL is not functioning properly.  This involves cutting the bone and placing a titanium spacer in order to keep the bone in its new position.  Additionally, a plate is applied to reinforce the repair.

Following surgery, the knee needs to be protected from overuse by having the dog refrain from running, jumping, rough play, or fast stairs.  Walking is encouraged as part of a detailed postoperative rehabilitation plan.  Pain medications and antibiotics are routinely used following orthopedic surgery.  Typically, the patient is seen at 2 weeks for staple or suture removal and again at 2 months for recheck x-rays of the knee to assess bone healing.   At this time an increase in activity back to a normal level is expected.  Many dogs will tear their other knee’s CrCL, so keeping them lean and active to improve muscle strength is important.

Miller JM, Shires PK, Lanz OI, Martin RA, Grant JW. Effect of 9mm tibial tuberosity advancement on the canine cranial cruciate deficient stifle. Vet Surg 2007;36:335-340.

Hoffmann DE, Miller JM, Ober CP, Lanz OI, Martin RA, Shires PK. Tibial tuberosity advancement in 65 canine stifles. Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2006;19:219-227.

Laparoscopic and Thoracoscopic Surgical Procedures

Oradell Animal Hospital is proud to offer a variety of abdominal and thoracic surgery completed in a minimally invasive manner. Dr. Miller, one of our board-certified small animal surgeons, has over a decade of training in laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgical procedures. Laparoscopy is the use of a small (5mm) camera and similar sized instruments to performed surgery inside of the body without large incisions with massive tissue exposure. The benefits of this technique include smaller incisions, less postoperative pain, lower infection rates and a shorter duration of the hospital stay.

Spaying is done on female dogs and cats to eliminate the possibility of pregnancy, prevent breast cancer, and reduce behavioral problems. This spay procedure can be performed in the traditional open abdomen method or as a laparoscopic procedure. Following a laparoscopic spay, there is less pain and less tissue trauma.

Some liver diseases will require a tissue biopsy in order to diagnose the disease. A small needle biopsy can be performed with ultrasound guidance, but often the sample is too small to make a diagnosis and the risk of bleeding is higher. With a laparoscopic liver biopsy, the surgeon can visualize the site for biopsy and manage any bleeding more securely. Multiple areas can also be easily sampled. This is usually an outpatient procedure.

GDV, or stomach bloat and twisting, is a common, life-threatening disease that occurs in older large breed dogs. This causes stomach damage and requires emergency surgery to untwist the stomach and prevent future twisting. In large breeds with a deep chest, a procedure to tack the stomach down can be performed at the time of neuter or spay to prevent GDV later in life. This procedure can be performed laparoscopically with smaller incisions and less pain.

Many other minimally invasive procedures can be accomplished effectively now:

Adrenal gland removal

Gall bladder removal

Organ biopsy

Pericardial sac removal

Lung biopsy

Cryptorchid testis removal

Feeding tube placement

Tumor biopsy

Persistent right aortic arch resection

 

Vaccination